Discover Prompt Day 7: The Desert Below

When I was young, my parents had friends who owned a cottage on beautiful Sanford Lake in Mid-Michigan. The lake provided swimming, boating, sailing, and fishing opportunities for many people in Michigan.

We enjoyed going to the lake and spent many weekends there. I learned how to water-ski on Sanford Lake. I don’t remember exactly where the cottage was, but I remember it being on the east side of the lake, right on the water. The wooden dock stretched out into the water and I loved watching the fish swimming below.

This is how Sanford Lake looks today. A desert, marked by tree stumps of many sizes that were hidden below the surface. They are evidence of water having buried them years before when the lake was created.

On May 19, 2020, torrential rains over many hours caused the water levels to rise in Wixom Lake, several miles to the north, and in Sanford Lake. Wixom Lake was held in place by the Edenville Dam. As the rains continued, the dam failed. A wall of water rushed down the Tittabawassee River, taking trees, boats, docks, and homes with it toward Sanford Lake.

Sanford Lake was a favorite destination for summer and winter sports enthusiasts.

Families were quickly devastated as the water and debris raced toward Sanford Lake. Within hours, the Sanford Dam also failed, releasing the lake from its boundaries, sending it crashing toward the City of Midland.

Two beautiful Michigan lakes were destroyed.

Business and property owners on Wixom and Sanford Lakes and the Tittabawassee River, as well as the residents of Midland, have a very long task ahead of them. I can’t imagine the lakes ever being restored, but then again, the two dams were constructed creating the two lakes. The Edenville Dam was built in 1924. The Sanford Dam was built in 1925. (Wikipedia).

I drove to Sanford and Edenville today. I wanted to see what is left for myself. Memories.

I wish the desert below could have remained covered.

Thirty-Day Blog Posting Challenge

I challenged myself to a thirty-day blogograma. This is day six. I tried this once before. Bust. This time, I am determined to follow through.

Why do this? Blogging is work. I’m talking about writing that means something. Okay, that’s judgmental and I apologize. All writing means something to someone, even if it’s only the person who put their fingers on the keys and actually pushed them down.

I haven’t done the research, so I don’t know where the term “blog” came from. I probably shouldn’t admit that, but there it is, out in the open. Maybe it’s an acronym, something like: Boisterous Longitudinal Ostentatious Gushings. No, it has to be better than that.

Begin Lasting Outreach Gatherings. Now that might be good for a church blog. Especially in relation to restarting face-to-face, or side-to-side, or mask-to-mask, or six-feet-to-six-feet-space-box gatherings.

How about Breaking Long Obvious Goofs. You know, writing about the kinds of things that have been around forever, but no one knows why and no one bothers to find out. However, if you do actually take a step to question something that has been around since there was dirt, you are attacked, despised, slandered, unfriended, blocked, unfollowed, and otherwise placed on the poop list, so you just know it would be better to leave it alone. It’s always been there, so stay away.

Maybe it’s Blending Life’s Occasional Grandeur. Good things do happen to everybody, at least a few times. A blog is a way to rake it all together and give it a title.

Blunders Long Overlooked Glowing. It could be a blog about the funny mistakes people have made that should be remembered. Oh, wait. We already have that! They’re called “Fails”! Millions and millions of fails.

Better Leave Our Group is a blog you send to someone by insinuation. You write an obscure message that seems to maybe be saying something, sort of, that a person just might take to mean their departure from a social group is desired. It contains plausible deniability because the message can’t be pinned on an individual.

Because Love Outlasts Grief. That could be a good one.

Where did I leave my coffee?

How Did You Find Your Niche?

Do you have a niche? How did you know it was right for you?

I need your help. I have been writing for many years. I have written four books, somewhere in excess of a thousand total pages. I have been published many times in curricula and periodicals. I had a weekly column in a local newspaper for two years. Writing has never been a problem, except for maybe being too wordy. My motto has always been, “why say something in ten words when you can say it in forty?” I’m like a friend once said, “The only way that guy could have said less is if he had talked longer.”

Blogging is driving me crazy! I can’t seem to get it right. Maybe I have read too much and I’m making it too hard. I read, “Don’t be personal.” Then someone else says, “Make sure it’s personal.” A blog authority says, “Keep it short.” Another says, “If you’re saying what you need to in five paragraphs, you don’t really have anything to say.” Someone with a ton of followers says, “Be passionate!” A writer with even more followers says, “Make sure you’re not too passionate about what you’re saying. You don’t want to drive people away.” Ahhhhhh!!

This whole thing about “niche” is mind-boggling! I know the definition. The problem is I can’t seem to find mine. I’m a pretty smart person. I’ve had a ton of experiences in many things, probably most of which no one would care about. I’m pretty talented. (Someone said, “If you don’t toot your own horn it won’t get tooted.”) But there are lots of really talented people around no one has ever heard of.

Not only have I done a bunch of writing for readers, I’ve written a big boat-load of music. Most of it absolutely worthless, not worth the space on the manuscript paper. Putting words together isn’t the problem. My problem is settling on something as a niche and sticking with it.

I’m not interested in writing a public diary as a blog. I don’t understand people who take pictures of what they’re eating and write about it. I don’t want to be like a pinball, bouncing around from one topic to the other.

So, I need help. I’m sincerely asking you for your advice. A plebe, a freshman, a neophyte, a beginner humbly asking for assistance.

How long have you been blogging?

What was your experience when you were first getting started?

Where did you find inspiration?

How did you keep going when it seemed like nothing was working?

I’m not trying to make money. I don’t have a website to which I’m trying to drive traffic. Is blogging worth the effort just as an expression of yourself?

Anything else you can offer that you think would be helpful, I will appreciate. Thank you for your time. And, thank you for being an example of how to be blogger.